European trouble may prevent prime minister Cameron’s trip to Japan

HMA-Official-Photo-website-348x448“If there is one thing that I want you to remember from this talk it is that the UK wants to have healthy growing partnerships with both Japan and China.”

That was the core message of the lecture which the British ambassador to Japan Tim Hitchens made to the Japan Society hosted by Nomura in London this week. He is an excellent communicator and his message was reinforced by an effective Power Point presentation.

The slides contained no words or numbers – only pictures. Many of them were pictures of Japanese people but Ambassador Hitchens also chose one very striking and famous image of a Chinese person: President Xi shaking hands with the Queen on his visit to London in the summer of 2015.

Prime Minister David Cameron said at the time that this was the start of a “golden era” in the relationship between Britain and China.

That caused disquiet in Japan, which has more in common politically with the UK than China. However, trade with China is far more important to the British economy.

The Ambassador announced that Prime Minister Cameron, the Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and the Chancellor George Osborne are all planning to visit Japan in 2016. He did not give a date.

Mr Hitchens did not say this but my view is that at the moment, it would be difficult for Mr Cameron to leave Europe, where he is battling with other European leaders. He is also battling with cabinet colleagues over whether Britain should remain an EU member.

If a referendum goes in favour of a withdrawal, Mr Cameron’s credibility will be damaged and he may resign, according to the Financial Times. Most people expect the referendum to take place in June.

Britain’s politicians have little time to worry about Asia. Japan’s attention will also be elsewhere as Prime Minister Abe hopes President Xi of China and President Park Guen-Hye of Korea will visit Japan soon.

There may even be a trilateral summit but at prime minister level not at presidential level. If so, this would involve Mr Abe, Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn of Korea and the Chinese premier Li Keqiang.

Ambassador Hitchens applauded Mr Abe’s efforts to improve relationships within the region. He himself will leave office at the end of the year but he has promised to return to the Japan Society to give an update on progress in 2017, by which time the political situation in Britain may look very different.

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