Fukushima anniversary leads to fresh debate on nuclear power

la-fg-japan-fukushima-robots-20160310-001“There is a saying in Japanese: put a lid on something that smells. Loosely speaking, that means hide a problem rather than deal with it.”

That was the comment made on a TV programme by Olivier Fabre of Reuters Television. His view, as an experienced journalist covering Japan, is that it is difficult to persuade people to speak openly on camera about painful experiences.

No recent experience has been more traumatic for Japan than the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake which occurred five years ago.

A reluctance among the Japanese to speak openly about the trauma has presented a challenge for the foreign journalists seeking to cover the event’s anniversary. What human stories can they tell if the humans don’t want to tell them?

In one report, the BBC’s Rupert Wingfield Hayes chose to focus not on the humans, but on animals.

He entered a home that had been deserted after the nuclear disaster and found it has been attacked by wild boars. The desolate scene looked like something from a horror movie. The boars were not shown on camera but the report showed the mess they had caused as they looked for rotten food in a broken refrigerator.

Other reporters spoke to people who had lost relatives or were forced to abandon their homes because of the nuclear disaster. CNBC interviewed Noshiyuki Kouri from Namie, a town just 10 km from the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

“I don’t know what to do,” he said.

“My kids and their families have no plans to return but my ancestors are buried here. I need to keep coming back to honour them and keep my home intact.”

The main issue covered by the media was Japan’s relationship with nuclear power.

A few days before the anniversary of the disaster, a court ordered the shutdown of two nuclear reactors which had previously been declared safe.

Naturally, this disturbed the Japanese, whose trust in the authorities was undermined by a series of mistakes and cover-ups at Fukushima.

The new shut down was especially worrying because the reactors in question had been restarted relatively recently. Their owner insisted they comply with rigorous safety standards.

Despite this setback, the Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe told a press conference: “Our resource-poor country cannot do without nuclear power to secure the stability of energy supply while considering what makes economic sense and the issue of climate change.”

He said the government would “not change its policy”.

The New York Times showed some sympathy for Mr Abe’s position, pointing out that Japan is a rather small, mountainous country that has always been short of natural resources on its own.

Japan is the biggest importer of natural gas in the world and that is why the alternative of homegrown nuclear was always so attractive—before Fukushima.

However, the rebroadcasting on television of the terrible events five years ago will be a stark reminder to the Japanese of the risks involved with nuclear power in a country prone to earthquakes and tsunamis.

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