Japanese journalists claim they are bullied by the government

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo, Japan, October 6, 2015. REUTERS/Yuya Shino

The prime minister of Japan is bullying journalists, according to one of the most experienced foreign correspondents in Tokyo.

Richard Lloyd Parry of the Times, who has written about Japan for more than twenty years, said Shinzo Abe and his government’s intimidation is causing newspapers and broadcasters in Japan to become “timid”. He said the situation is becoming worse.

His comments follow the departure of several leading broadcast journalists – Ichiro Furutachi, Hiroko Kuniya and Shigetada Kishii – who were noted for their tough line of questioning of politicians.

Mr Lloyd Parry told the Japan Now conference that the government has “been spinning pretty hard to get things reported their way. It’s the government’s job to try to tell the story their way – but it’s the job of the media to resist that.”

Another British paper, the Guardian, said the departure of the television reporters followed a warning by minister Sanae Takaichi that broadcasters which repeatedly failed to show “fairness” in their political coverage, despite official warnings, could be taken off the air.

“This is nothing but intimidation against broadcasters,” the Japan Federation of Commercial Broadcast Workers’ Union said in a statement. “[Takaichi’s] remarks represent a glaring misinterpretation of the law and we demand that she promptly retract her remarks.”

Richard Lloyd Parry of the Times said: “As a British reporter, you aim to heap embarrassment and shame on someone in authority and if you do so, you win admiration of your colleagues. In Japan, some reporters, as individuals, want to dig dirt and want to challenge power. But that is generally not true of the big media companies. They explain power rather than challenge power.”

However, scandals revealed by the press have led to two high level political resignations in Japan so far this year.

Firstly, Japan’s Economy minister Akira Amari stepped down after allegations of corruption appeared in the weekly Japanese magazine Shukan Bunshun.

A few weeks later, the same magazine reported that a politician Kensuke Miyazaki was having an extramarital affair days before his wife gave birth. That ruined his image as a caring family man, who was calling for laws to protect fathers who want to take time off work to care for their wives and young children.

Both resignations received extensive media coverage in the Japanese mainstream press and were picked up by the international media.
So although most respectable people say they do not believe all things they read in gossipy magazines like Shukan Bunshun, they hold considerable influence.

And their reporters cannot be described as timid when it comes to revealing the shady side of powerful people.

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