Is Abe pushing Japan to the far right?

[:en]http-%2F%2Fcom.ft.imagepublish.prod.s3.amazonaws

Is it true that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe believes that Japan did nothing wrong in the Second World War?

That was the assertion made by the journalist Richard Lloyd Parry in the Times newspaper this week.

In assessing Mr Abe’s nationalism, Lloyd Parry described what he believes are the views of the prime minister: “Japan did nothing wrong during the war – or nothing that western colonial powers were not also doing. The atrocities committed by the Imperial Army are gross exaggerations conjured up by Japan’s enemies.”

If those are indeed Mr Abe’s opinions, they align closely with those on the right wing extreme. Such views are associated with the neo-fascists who drive around Tokyo in black vans broadcasting propaganda, to the disgust of most Japanese people.

Yet Mr Abe has recently won a major election, which suggests that he is not regarded as an extremist by most voters. The Liberal Democratic Party – normally regarded as centre right – won a solid majority in the upper house of the parliament. Thus strengthened, Mr Abe could now prepare to revise Clause Nine of Japan’s constitution, which commits it to pacifism.

A sympathetic view for Mr Abe’s proposal for a revision of the constitution was expressed in an editorial in the Financial Times, now owned by the Japanese newspaper the Nikkei: “Japan is justified in adapting its national security framework to a changing world. But Mr Abe must first make the case to the Japanese people.”

The Financial Times also published an opinion piece by Sheila Smith, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. She expressed concern at any revision of the constitution, which to her mind, strengthens the rights of individuals in Japan, including people’s right to make “choices of religion, work, protest and due process which Japanese citizens today take for granted.”

Even if Mr Abe wishes to change the constitution and has support in parliament, he still needs public support. That would mean a referendum.

Japan has never held a referendum and to do so now risks division. The Economist said: “Close advisors suggest that Mr Abe will not push for early change. Brexit, they say, has come as a stark reminder to him of how, without laying the groundwork, a referendum can divide a country and produce an unexpected outcome.”

For a cautious politician like Mr Abe, the prospect of calling a referendum that might go against him is an enormous risk. Yet he may take such a risk in pursuit of his long term goal of preparing Japan to take a much more assertive global role.[:ja]http-%2F%2Fcom.ft.imagepublish.prod.s3.amazonaws

安倍首相は、第二次大戦中に日本は何ら悪いことをしていないと信じきっているというのは、果たして本当なのか。

タイムズ紙のリチャード・ロイド・ペリー記者は、これが事実であると主張する。

安倍首相のナショナリズムを評価するにあたり、ロイド・ペリー記者は、首相の見解とは以下のようなものであると述べている。「日本は戦時中に何ら悪いことはしなかった。または西洋の宗主国と同様のことしか行わなかった。帝国陸軍が行ったものとして伝えられている残虐行為とは、日本の敵国によるでっち上げである。」

もし、これが本当に安倍首相の考えなのであれば、極右の意見とほぼ一致する。こうした見解は、黒い街宣車に乗ってプロパガンダをまき散らすネオ・ファシストと呼ばれる人々の考えと似通っており、大多数の日本人が眉をしかめるような内容のものだ。

しかしながら、安倍首相はつい先日行われた選挙で勝利を収めたばかり。つまり、多くの有権者は、彼を過激主義者とは見なしていないと言える。一般的には中道右派とされている自由民主党は、先の参議院で安定過半数を得た。支持を固めたことで、安倍首相はようやく日本国憲法の第9条を改憲する準備を始めることができるのだ。

改憲を目指す安倍首相の提案に対して、今では日本経済新聞の傘下に入ったフィナンシャル・タイムズ紙の社説は一定の理解を示している。「世界情勢の変化に応じて、国家安全保障体制を適応させるという考えは理にかなっている。ただし安倍首相は、まず日本の国民に対してこの問題を明らかにしなければならない。」

フィナンシャル・タイムズ紙は、加えて外交問題評議会のシニア・フェローであるシェリア・スミス氏の意見も紹介している。彼女の見解によれば、いかなる内容であれ、改憲により日本における個人の権利が拡大されるのではないかとの懸念がある。そうした権利の中には、日本の国民が今は当然のものと考えている宗教、仕事、抗議運動やそれらの関連手続きについての選択に関するものが含まれるという。

安倍首相が改憲を考えており、さらには議会の支持を得ているのだとしても、彼はさらに国民の支持を得なければならない。言い換えれば、国民投票を実施する必要がある。

日本はこれまで国民投票を実施したことがない。そして、実施すれば、国家を分裂の危機にさらすことになる。エコノミスト誌は次のように主張している。「安倍首相の側近たちは、首相に対して、早期の改革を推進しないように求めている。土台作りなしに国民投票を行えば、国を分裂させ、また思いがけない結果を生むということを英国のEU離脱決定が知らしめたからである。」

安倍首相のような用心深い政治家にとって、首相を窮地に追い込みかねない国民投票の実施は、多大なリスクとなる。しかしながら、日本が世界においてより主体的な役割を負うべきという彼の長期的な目標のために、安倍首相がそのリスクを負う可能性が全くないとは言えないだろう。[:]

One Comment

  • Mr. Abe has been speaking of this change since his first term as PM. Given how far Japan has come in the last 10 years in terms establishing stronger bi-lateral defense relationships with other countries than the US and the changes that have been made in the export laws for defense equipment and services, this is a logical outcome of his policies. Although this has been done very much in the open as far as the rest of Asia and the Western World is concerned it always seems to appear to be a mystery to my non-defense related Japanese friends. In the world I work in it’s seen as “about time”, in the rest of Japan it seems times stopped on this issue in 1952.

Comments are closed.