Saving Japan from the fate of death by overwork

[:en]96958A9C93819695E1E2E2E6838DE2E3E3E0E0E2E3E0E2E2E2E2E2E2-DSXBZO4904270001122012I00002-PB1-4

The Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, the Japanese Communist Party and the Bank of Japan all agree on one principle; the way Japanese people approach their work should change.

Labour reform is Japan’s “biggest challenge” according to Prime Minister Abe. When I met with representatives of the Bank of Japan in Tokyo recently they told me it is also Governor Kuroda’s top priority.

On the other side of the political divide is the Japanese Communist Party, which is fully committed to the opposition alliance aim to bring down the Abe government.

It describes workplace problems in stark terms: “Under the tyrannical rule of large corporations… workers are afflicted by long hours of work and excessively heavy workloads that could result in karoshi (death from overwork).”

The Communist Party complains about the problems of forced overtime, a lack of female participation in the workforce and a lack of job security. This strikes a chord with many hard working Japanese people and may explain why the party did well in recent elections and now has 14 seats in the Upper House of Parliament.

Death from overwork is rare but many people face hardship trying to balance their jobs with care for children or elderly relatives. An employee who hopes to rise in a corporation is often expected to work between 10 and 15 hours a day. Combined with commuting and afterwork socialising, that leaves little time for household work, the overwhelming amount of which is still done by women. Japanese men do some of the least housework of men in any developed country.

Foreign investors do not especially care if Japanese men clean the bathroom or do the washing up. But they are concerned that inefficient work practices hold back Japan’s economy. Take the view of Fisher Investments, an independent investment adviser with US offices in Washington and California. Its recent report on Japan complained about “protectionist regulations promoted by strong vested interests that discourage competition and a byzantine labor code that discourages companies from hiring new workers or effectively competing with each other.”

Mr Abe wants to change things. Earlier this month he unveiled a package which puts particular emphasis on helping workers who do not have secure full-time positions, including ensuring equal pay for equal work and raising the minimum wage.

Other reforms aim to boost female labour force participation, such as reducing excessive work hours and encouraging telecommuting.

These labour reforms form part of the third arrow of Abenomics – which is actually lots of little arrows, aimed at many targets.

The ultimate goal is profound social change within Japan, a process which is not easy to measure.

Register to subscribe
[:ja]96958A9C93819695E1E2E2E6838DE2E3E3E0E0E2E3E0E2E2E2E2E2E2-DSXBZO4904270001122012I00002-PB1-4日本の首相安倍晋三、日本共産党と日本銀行は一つの原則に合意します; 日本人は仕事への体制を変更した方がいい。

安部首相によると、労働改革は日本の「最大の課題」である。東京の日本銀行の代表人たちと最近会った際に、それは黒田知事の最優先事項でもあると話していた。

政治的分裂の反対側には日本共産党があり彼らは完全に安部政権を引き下ろすという目的がある。

彼らは職場での問題について純然たる説明をしている。「大企業の専制ルールの下では労働者が長い営業時間と過剰な労働に影響され過労死(オーバーワークが原因で死に至ること)につながる可能性があります。」

共産党は強制残業の問題、従業員としての女性の参加の欠如や、雇用保障の欠如について苦言している。これは多くの懸命な日本人から感情的な反応を引き起こし、彼らが国会の参議院で14議席を獲得した理由の説明となるかもしれない。

過労死はまれであるが、多くの人々は子供や高齢者の親族のケアと仕事のバランスを取るなどというの苦難に直面している。民間企業で出世を考えている従業員は、頻繁に1日10~15時間ほど働くはずであると思われている。通勤と仕事の後の付き合いの後には、ほとんどは女性がこなす家事をやる時間などほとんど残らない。日本人男性は先進国の男性達の中では最小量の家事のお手伝いをやる。

外人投資家は日本人男性が浴室を掃除するか、または食器を洗うかなどということは得に気にていない。しかし彼らは非効率的な日本人の作業の習慣が日本経済を食い止めるのではないかと、心配している。ワシントンとカリフォルニア州に米国のオフィスをもつ独立系投資顧問のフィッシャー・インベストメンツ氏からの意見を用いる。彼らの最近の日本についてのレポートはこれに対して不満:“新たな労働者を雇うことは勧めなく互いの企業競合を落胆させたりする複雑な労働規約や競争を阻止する強力な既得権益者によって促進される保護主義的規制。”

安倍氏は物事を変えたがっている。今月初め、彼は同一労働同一賃金の確保や最低賃金の引き上げなど、確実なフルタイムではない労働者を支援することに重点を置いた法案を発表した。

他の改革は、このような過度の労働時間を削減し、在宅勤務を奨励し女性の労働参加を高めることを目指している。これらの労働改革はアベノミクスの第三の矢の一部を形成する –それらは実際、多くのターゲットに向けた小さな矢がたくさんある。最終的な目標は目覚ましい日本国内の社会変化、しかしその過程の想定は簡単なことではない。